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FAQs

1. Why does my bill change from quarter to quarter?
2. Why is my bill so high?
3. How do I check for leaks?


1. Why does my bill change from quarter to quarter?
Bills change according to water usage, which fluctuates as a result of a number of things, including the number of people who live at a property. Everyone has different personal water habits that will affect the amount of water used in a given month, and water consumption may vary from season to season. Many customers increase their water consumption in the summer months by using water-cooled air conditioning, watering lawns or gardens, washing cars, filling swimming pools, etc. Bills may also fluctuate based on the number of days in a billing period. The North Tiverton Fire District bills every quarter, however, on occasion a bill can be over or under the 90-day period. Almost all bills are based on actual readings, while a few estimated bills are based on usage history.

2. Why is my bill so high?
Bills change according to water usage, which fluctuates from month to month. A drastic increase in consumption could be an indication that a problem at a property exists and should be inspected for leaks by checking all plumbing, fixtures and water appliances. A quick check would be to turn off all appliances and fixtures that use water and check the small red/blue arrow or dial on the face of the meter. If there is any movement, even slightly, you may have a leak. If you can isolate the leak to a fixture, typically a toilet, contact a plumbing professional for assistance.

3. How do I check for leaks?
Your meter is usually located in the basement. On your meter face is a red or blue triangle. If no water is being used, your triangle will be still. If the small triangle is rotating, then water is being drawn from somewhere in your building. Check all faucets and piping for leaks by monitoring for drips of water under sinks and from exposed pipes. Add a few drops of food coloring in the toilet tank. If the food coloring appears in the toilet bowl, this means you have a leak. Some toilet leaks are intermittent, so you don’t always see or hear the water running. A leaking toilet can waste up to 3,000 gallons per day. Check plumbing in the basement by monitoring for drips of water coming from exposed pipes. Occasionally, leaks develop behind walls or in areas that are not visible. Read your meter periodically to monitor for drastic changes.

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